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More Math Games with Dice

April 22nd, 2010 · 8 Comments

One of the advantages of playing math games with dice is that so little is required to engage your child’s full focus and attention. There’s nothing to plug in. No batteries are required. No whiz-bang effects are going to super charge your child’s emotions.

Improve math skillsThese games require a grasp of the Mayan Numeric System. If you haven’t already explored Mayan numbers with your child, it only takes a few minutes to pick up the basics: Mayan Numbers for Kids

Step 1. Getting the concept:

1) Roll two dice.
a) Assign the larger number to the 10’s place value, and the smaller number to the 1’s place value.
For example: 5 and 2 are 52
because (5 x 10) + (2 x 1) = 52.

2) Now roll three dice.
a) Assign the largest number to the 100’s place value, the middle number to the 10’s place value, and the smallest number to the 1’s place value.
For example: 5 and 2 and 1 are 521
because (5 x 100) + (2 x 10) + (1 x 1) = 521.

Step 2. Apply the concept to the Mayan Numeric System:

1) Roll two dice.
a) Assign the larger number to the 20’s place value, and the smaller number to the 1’s place value.
For example: 5 and 2 are 102
because (5 x 20) + (2 x 1) = 102.

2) Now roll three dice.
a) Assign the largest number to the 400’s place value, the middle number to the 20’s place value, and the smallest number to the 1’s place value.
For example: 5 and 2 and 1 are 2041
because (5 x 400) + (2 x 20) + (1 x 1) = 2041.

Use the concept from Step 2 to play these games:

Game 1:
1) Roll two dice.
a) Assign the larger number to the 20’s place value, and the smaller number to the 1’s place value.
2) The first player to say the correct number out loud scores a point.
3) The first player to reach ten points wins.

Game 2:
1) Roll two dice.
a) Assign the larger number to the 20’s place value, and the smaller number to the 1’s place value.
2) The first player to write the number correctly scores a point.
3) The first player to reach ten points wins.

Game 3:
1) Roll three dice.
a) Assign the largest number to the 400’s place value, the middle number to the 20’s place value, and the smallest number to the 1’s place value.
2) The first player to say the correct number out loud scores a point.
3) The first player to reach ten points wins.

Game 4:
1) Roll three dice.
a) Assign the largest number to the 400’s place value, the middle number to the 20’s place value, and the smallest number to the 1’s place value.
2) The first player to write the number correctly scores a point.
3) The first player to reach ten points wins.

Game 5:
1) Roll two dice.
a) Assign the larger number to the 20’s place value, and the smaller number to the 1’s place value.
2) Multiply the two numbers.
For example: 4 and 3 are 240
because (4 x 20) x (3 x 1) =
80 x 3=
240.

3) The first player to say the correct number out loud scores a point.
4) The first player to reach ten points wins.

Game 6: Repeat game 5, except this time the first person to write the correct number scores a point.

Unlike electronic games, math games with dice are stimulating without being addictive. The activities, which fortify a conceptual grasp of mathematics, are fun and rewarding for the simple reason that your child is advancing skills and understanding. Best of all, there is no mistaking the source of stimulus. The basic ingredient is your child’s ability to calculate rapidly and with precision–something your child can utilize anytime under any circumstances. With electronic gadgetry, the gadget is always required.

Have Fun!

Tags: Kids’ Activities

8 responses so far ↓

  • 1 Rosebelle // Apr 23, 2010 at 8:03 pm

    You presented the step by step instructions very well. Some math instructions are written in a way that are confusing. My daughter is learning algorithms for division and multiplication and it is so confusing to understand even though it’s just third grade math!

  • 2 Spaghetti Box Kids // Apr 23, 2010 at 10:45 pm

    I know what you mean. I used to feel that way sometimes about our son’s grade school math. It can take a lot of patience.

  • 3 Torilpia // Apr 26, 2010 at 4:34 pm

    Lots of fun here .. :o) My youngest loves to play with numbers :o)

  • 4 Spaghetti Box Kids // Apr 26, 2010 at 5:11 pm

    Good stuff. Hope you have fun with it.

  • 5 Jane // Jan 12, 2011 at 10:16 pm

    Love these sort of games and find that my kids do too. Another source I like for these type of games for younger children are the K, 1st and 2nd grade ‘Number’ pages at:
    http://www.k-5mathteachingresources.com/

  • 6 Spaghetti Box Kids // Jan 13, 2011 at 4:52 am

    Thanks for the input &add’l information. All the best. -AV

  • 7 Some random boy // Jun 4, 2012 at 2:01 pm

    I like this website very much. I have found many creative and good reports on the mayan numeral system. I also found games to help improve those skills. This website helped me finish an important project of mine. Thank you spaghettiboxkids.com

  • 8 Spaghetti Box Kids // Jun 5, 2012 at 2:11 am

    Thanks for taking a minute to share your thoughts. Good to know the article helped you figure out Mayan numbers. It’s a fun system once you catch on. All the Best- AV

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